Gratitude within Bonding, 40 Days Omer 5782

Today is forty days, which is five weeks and five days of the Omer in the year 5782. הוד שביסוד, Hod ShebeYesod, Gratitude within Foundation. Three years ago, I was celebrating my eldest completing kindergarten. This year, my youngest has two more days in kinder. And in four / five days (Jewish / secular time), I will be ordained. I am so grateful for my family, the foundation of my spiritual practice. What binds you to living fully into life beyond the internet?

Finding Space for Joy

The world is frightening. The fractured nature of the United States is disheartening. The death of children and teachers, along with the murder of grocery shoppers and the attack on people in church, is overwhelming. The choice to ignore the ongoing pandemic and very real threat of longterm COVID could break me.

I choose to allow space for joy. For laughter and love. I cannot be somber and serious 24/7.

The ending of “This is Us” landed differently than it would have a few weeks ago. I couldn’t help thinking of the nineteen children and two adults who lost their lives yesterday. No neat ending. No chance to linger before leaving the material world. Just alive, celebrating accomplishments in the morning and dead by 1 p.m.

Even as I declare my choice to lean into joy, reality keeps tugging at my thought train.

The Cusp of Change

In less than a week, I will be an ordained rabbi. My thoughts will turn from counting the days left in school to sorting / purging / packing my home. (More on that later.)

Anxiety surrounds me. My family is nervous. Change is hard. Letting go of friendships, embarking into the unknown. Changing schools and communities. All of this would be hard without Evil rampaging through the country.

I am so grateful that the soul of my home is portable. Wherever my family is, I am surrounded by home. May we all find the people who ground us. May we each have the space to live into ourselves. May we continue to gather. And may our collective pain lead to collective action.

May we stop sacrificing children on the altar of guns.

40 Days of the Omer Previously…

Allowing Our Souls to Awaken, 5781 / 2021.

Holy vessel of grief and isolation, 5780 / 2020.

Celebrating kindergarten graduation and family, 5779 / 2019.

Blissful, total presence with one another, 5778 / 2018.

Loosening material bonds to allow Divine splendor in, 5777 / 2017.


Image by Torsten Kellermann via Pexels.

Covenantal Love within Foundation, 36 Days Omer 5782

Today is thirty-six days, which is five weeks and one day of the Omer in the year 5782. חסד שביסוד, Chesed ShebeYesod, Covenantal Love within Foundation. Yesod can be described as Foundation or Bonding. Connecting the Flow of the Divine into how we live into each day. Choosing to tie ourselves to ideals beyond the material realm. Today is a day to meditate on our connection to God’s Love.

Choosing Hope

We are living through unprecedented times. It is an act of will to see clear-eyed the dangers facing us individually and collectively while also embracing hope. The dangers from COVID-19 are not over. Russia, a fascist nuclear power, invaded a sovereign nation, Ukraine. Russian soldiers killed many Ukrainian civilians and raped / tortured even more. China continues to practice genocide against the Uyghurs and denies human rights to all of its citizens, including Hong Kongers and Tibetans. The basic right to bodily autonomy in the United States is under attack, with the Supreme Court on the verge of imposing Christian religious law on our secular democracy. Becoming contagious with a debilitating novel virus can be mistaken for catching a cold. Multiple COVID-19 infections increases the likelihood of longterm physical damage.

Nevertheless, I choose hope.

I choose to embrace God’s Love.

God’s Love surrounds me.

I am loved completely for who I am in this moment.

Meditating into God’s never-ending Love, I am never alone.

May the embrace of the Never-Ending Love pulsing through the universe ground you.

May you know how important the worlds within you are.

May the Foundation of your life be built upon the Rock of God’s Love.

Previously on 36 Days of the Omer…

Leaning Into Foundational Lovingkindness, 5781 / 2021.

Covenantal Love in Personality, 5780 / 2020.

Nurturing the child within, 5779 / 2019.

Embracing full-throated love, 5778 / 2018.

Selfless love and covenantal communities, 5777 / 2017.


Image by Frank Winkler via Pixabay.

Seventeen Days of the Omer, Autonomy in the Balance

Today is seventeen days, which is two weeks and three days of the Omer 5782. תפארת שבתפארת. Beauty within Beauty. We are also witnessing the beginning of the end of bodily autonomy in the United States. Human rights are going to be stripped from people by the United States Supreme Court.

This year, I challenged myself to create seven meditations on a single side of each sefirot, even though they all contain a constellation of ideas. So for Tiferet, I solely wanted to speak about Beauty. I was going to ignore Compassion, which has a womb at the root of the word. And I wanted to ignore my other favorite aspece of this sefirah, Truth, which is so deeply embedded in how I approach the world. Perhaps I could knock out a few paragraphs on the essence of Beauty in the morning when the exhaustion has dissipated a bit?

Abortion is a Human Right. Reproductive Healthcare is Healthcare.

Roe v Wade was decided on the basis of the right to privacy. This Twitter thread provides an overview of the rulings that could be overturned based on throwing out this settled precedent.

Most critically, I want to say: my bodily autonomy is not up for debate. I am not moving from the fact that whatever healthcare a child-bearing person decides to make, that is a decision they choose alone. Every single person has the right to make their healthcare decisions for themselves.

I could tell you my own experiences with abortion, but I shouldn’t have to do that to convince someone that my body is my own business and child-bearing people are human beings who should not be treated as incapable of making their own healthcare decisions.

Religious Liberty is Secondary

To be clear: Jewish law is not made on the basis of poetry. The Psalter is not the origin of our law code. Within our Bible, it is *very* clear that life is always more important than potential life.

Also, since “conservatives” are so enamored with the idea of “original intent,” let’s remember that the concept of the soul did not exist when the Torah or the Psalms were written. Reading soul-language into the Bible is a retroactive continuity decision after Jews came in contact with Pagan Greeks and decided to appropriate the soul-concept into their civilization.

USA Today wrote a clear overview of the Jewish understanding that life does not begin at conception.

I oppose placing Christian theology above individual bodily autonomy. I oppose government deciding what healthcare human beings can choose to receive. And yes, I completely agree with the majority of rabbis throughout the centuries who have prioritized every woman’s life above the potential life that she may be carrying in her body. A woman can choose whatever medical procedure or medication is needed to protect her mental and physical health.

On the Beauty Front: A Magnificent Art Exhibit is Closing

Circling back to Tiferet ShebeTiferet, the Beauty within Beauty of the 17th day of the Omer.

Jenny Yurshansky‘s incredible exhibit is up for the next ten days at the American Jewish University. As explained in the Los Angeles Times review of Yurshansky’s solo exhibit, it is a timely piece that looks at what it means to be a refugee. She has one final artist talk scheduled for Mother’s Day and you don’t want to miss it if you’re in the LA area.

I have the distinct honor of knowing Ms. Yurshansky, as we went to junior high school together.

Previously on the 17th day of the Omer

Compassion and the Self-Reflective Act of Prayer, 5781 / 2021.

Explore the depths and limits of truth, 5780 / 2020.

Synthesizing grace and judgment, 5779 / 2019.

Sinking into beautiful truth, 5778 / 2018.

Reaching towards pure compassion, 5777 / 2017.


Image by Blandine Joannic via Pixabay.

Prayer for Ukraine

The Ukrainian people are fighting against Russian imperialism.

Ukrainians are fighting for their right to live.

They fight so that they are not raped, tortured, and murdered by the Russian army.

I pray for peace.

I pray for the peace that can only come when a people defend themselves.

I pray that heavy weaponry from the United States and elsewhere arrives speedily.

I pray the Ukrainian army has every plane, every tank, every bullet it needs to stand up to evil.

I know this prayer is jarring, so I do not presume to pray on behalf of the kahal.

May the Ukrainian people of all ethnicities and all religions be safe and secure. May those who have fled the war be supported. May all refugees of all nationalities be helped.

May we have the strength to fight evil. May we never turn our backs on people who fight evil.

May Ukraine’s sovereignty be honored and her people return.

May God strengthen our resolve. May democratic and free people remain united in support of Ukraine’s defense.

May victory come speedily and soon for Ukraine.

Slava Ukraine. Glory to Ukraine.

Slava El Shaddai. Glory to God, the Source of Protection.


Composed for the AJRCA minyan, April 25, 2022.

Image by Michael Jahn via Pixabay.

Reflections on Ukraine Shabbat Shekalim 5782

Like many of you, my family roots are in the Pale Settlement. The Pale Settlement was the Western portion of Russia, the only part of the country where Jews were allowed to live. Both sides of my family are from that region and my mom’s side is from Ukraine specifically. My great-grandfather, David Margolis, was conscripted into the Russian Army from Kiev. At the turn of the twentieth century, Jewish communities were ripped apart, with more and more children and young men forced into military service. David did not go quietly. He killed his commanding officer and took the man’s identity papers, then started migrating towards the United States. He married my great-grandmother, Minnie Sudaken, in England as they traveled towards this country.

Even those of us who don’t have familial connections to Ukraine experienced a glimpse of the horror experienced by Ukrainian Jews during the Shoah, the Holocaust. Our Jewish Federation’s Every Person Has a Name Holocoaust Memorial Event honored those murdered at Babi Yar, a ravine in Kiev. From babies to the elderly, our fellow Jews were slaughtered. I have to say, going to Pasadena City Hall early in the morning, and reading those names was a singular experience for me. I felt the weight of all who came before us. All of the shattered dreams and decimated communities.

And yet, Am Yisrael Chai. The People Israel Live. In the seventy-six years since World War II, Jews returned to Ukraine. As Jewish Federation Executive Director and TBD member Jason Moss pointed out in his email today, there are now approximately 200,000 Jews living in Ukraine, with close to 300 communal Jewish organizations.

As you probably know, the democratically-elected leader of Ukraine, President Volodymyr Zelensky is Jewish. This makes the Putin’s lie that Ukraine is led by “drug addicts and neo-Nazis” all the more despicable. Make no mistake – this is a battle against autocracy, and against evil.

There is a robust tradition in Judaism to call out evil and fight against it. Earlier in Exodus, we read about the Amalekites. Amalek is said to be the grandson of Esau and the wellspring of our enemies. In Deuteronomy, we are called to wipe out the Amalekites and to always remember the evil they did to us. This is a troubling commandment for the peace-focused among us.

To be clear, I do not think the United States or another country should enter this war. But I do believe Ukrainians have the right to self defense. President Zelensky called on Ukrainians to use molotov cocktails to defend their capital. Today, television and radio stations were airing instructions on how to make them. It is hard for us to imagine this level of ground offensive to defend our country. And yet, it is the reality being faced by our brothers and sisters in Ukraine.

Our prayers for peace are not only the hope for a cessation of violence. I pray for Ukraine’s sovereignty. I pray the people of Ukraine live through this horror. I pray the people of Russia topple Putin’s regime. I pray that truth and democracy are victorious over lies and kleptocracy.

The Jewish Federations of North America set up Ukraine Crisis Fund to support Jews in Ukraine, using their established local organizational support network. By contributing to the fund, you will help Ukrainian Jews survive this invasion and choose their own future, whether that means moving to Israel or rebuilding their communities within Ukraine.

I know that the invasion of Ukraine is at the top of everyone’s mind this week. While I am not going to give a second sermon on Parashat Vayeikhel, I do want to speak briefly about the fact that this is Shabbat Shekalim. There are four special Shabbats leading up to Passover. The cycle of our calendar is intentional. The name Shabbat Shekalim refers to an additional section of Torah added to the weekly reading. It actually comes from last week’s parshah. Exodus chapter 30 verses 11 through 16 describe a census where every adult Israelite was expected to contribute a half-shekel to the creation of the Mishkan, the portable sanctuary.

Moving forward to the time of the Temple in Jerusalem, an annual tax was collected on the first of Nissan, and notices regarding the approaching deadline began at this time, roughly a month before the tax was due.

We each have an equal obligation to the continuation of the Jewish people. Regardless of how much money we have, we all have gifts to share. So if you feel compelled to give to the Jewish Federation Ukraine Crisis Fund, or another charity supporting the Ukrainian people, please consider also giving money to support the ongoing work of our local community at Temple Beth David. And if you are not yet a member of TBD, we welcome you to join us.

May our support for democracy and for peace never waver. May our community, and the people of the world be led with honesty towards a peaceful future.

Shabbat shalom.

Sermon originally delivered to the Temple Beth David Shabbat service on Friday, February 25, 2022; 25 Adar I 5782.

God appeared on New Year’s Eve

Shabbat Shalom and Happy New Year. 

Tonight is unusual – the last time Kabbalat Shabbat and New Year’s Eve occurred together was in 2011. 

Ezra Furman, a Jewish musician, said it best in a tweet. They wrote:

I like having both too. 

I would like to take a few minutes now to connect this week’s Torah portion to being on the cusp of a secular new year. That is, as time moves forward, how are we living into our foundational stories? And what does this week’s story reveal to us about building a future for ourselves, individually and collectively?

This week’s Torah portion, Va’era

This week’s Torah portion, Va’era, begins with the revelation of God’s True Name. 

God’s True Name is spelled yud, hay, vav, hay. In scholarly circles The Name is described as the Tetragrammaton, which simply means the four-letter word.

As Jews, we traditionally never pronounce The Name and cover it up with the word Adonai, which means “my Lord.” Adonai is most often translated as “Lord.” 

Claiming that God’s Most Essential Name is “Lord” has, unfortunately, left many of us disconnected from the Source of Life. It is a pious cover for revelation. A way to indicate God rules over us. The word “Lord” denies individual choice and freedom.

Rather than using “Lord” as the English translation of Y H V H, I will say “HaShem,” which simply means “The Name.” For me, HaShem is more forceful than Adonai.

God Appears Differently to Moses

The portion begins with God explaining to Moses the difference between The Name and how God appeared to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. It reads:

God spoke to Moses and said to him: “I am HaShem. I appeared to Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob as El Shaddai, but I did not make Myself known to them by My name HaShem.”

Va’era is the first word of the second sentence – it means, “I appeared.” What does it mean that God appeared one way to earlier generations and differently to Moses?

Moses as the Pinnacle of Revelation

Traditionally, Judaism understands Moses as the pinnacle, the height, of human interaction with God. Moses knew God more intimately than any human before him or since him. This is why Judaism constantly connects innovation with Moses, claiming that all was revealed to Moses at Mt. Sinai.

(Be sure to join us in three weeks, on January 22, for more regarding the revelation at Mt. Sinai.) 

Does Revelation Evolve Over Time?

But, if Moses experienced God more fully than previous generations, why should we believe that our understanding of the Divine ended on Mt. Sinai? Personally, I see this Torah portion as a proof text for the ongoing revelation of God.

What I mean is that human understanding of the nature of reality and the nature of God deepens over time. Our relationships, with each other and with God, are more complex than any previous generation.

The Jewish tradition is a roadmap for our journey. Neither humanity nor God stopped evolving on Mt. Sinai.

God Appears to Pharaoh Through Moses and Aaron

Following the revelation of God’s True Name, the Torah portion continues with Moses and Aaron taking up the mantle of leadership. God says to Moses: “See, I place you in the role of God to Pharaoh, with your brother Aaron as your prophet.” 

God explains the purpose of the ten plagues, saying: “I will harden Pharaoh’s heart, that I may multiply My signs and marvels in the land of Egypt. …And the Egyptians shall know that I am HaShem, when I stretch out My hand over Egypt and bring out the Israelites from their midst.” 

Leaders Guide Us Towards Our Best Selves

The Israelites needed Moses and Aaron to guide them out of Egypt. Leaders help us see the possibility of a future better than today. The process takes time and commitment. We have to trust our leaders in order to be transformed by their insights.

Like Moses and Aaron, modern leaders of the Jewish people remind us that it is possible to hear the call of freedom. Leaders guide us on the journey. It is within our power to overcome adversity and to revel in deep joy, love, and gratitude.

We can choose to strive towards our best selves. We can choose leaders who help us remember our deepest truths, and to break free of our bondage.

Choosing Joy This New Year’s Eve

Yes, our lives have been altered by this pandemic in ways that we could never have imagined a few short years ago. Yet, we continue to have this community to support us along the way. Every week, we have the opportunity to join together – appreciating our common humanity, taking time to live into the deepest part of ourselves, and connect to our Cosmic Companion.

God is More Abstract than How God Appears in the Bible

We do not need a burning bush or a magic rod to connect us with HaShem. We have the souls around us and the Soul of the Universe to hold us on our journey through time. 

A Prayer for God’s Appearance in 2022

As Temple Beth David steps forward into 2022, may we remember that God appears whenever we hold space for the people around us.  

God appears when we comfort mourners.

God appears when we pray for the sick.

God appears when we doubt God’s presence. 

God appears when we express gratitude for our food and our drinks.

God appears when we revel in the growth of our children. 

God appears when we choose to create space for holiness. 

When we acknowledge Shabbat and other Jewish holidays, God appears. 

May God appear to you this Shabbat. May you experience joyfulness and hope as we welcome a new secular year and the unfolding future of our beloved community. Shabbat Shalom.

Shabbat Shuvah, 20th anniversary Terror Attack in the United States

Last night, I co-led Kabbalat Shabbat services at Temple Beth David of San Gabriel Valley with Cantor Orly Campbell. We tried to hold space for the spiritual meaning of both the Shabbat of Return in the midst of the High Holy Days and the twentieth anniversary of the terror attack on the United States.

Shabbat is not a time of mourning

Jewish tradition tells us to set aside our mourning on Shabbat. That the holiness of the day takes precedence over our personal grief. It is why we do not bury people on Shabbat (or any Jewish holiday). And it is why mourners are asked to leave their homes and attend services at synagogue.

Yet, even though we elevate Shabbat, we do not ignore the reality of death. The Mourner’s Kaddish is included in all Jewish services. Some holidays include a special service in remembrance of the dead, known as Yizkor. We make a point of remembering people on the anniversary of their death, their yarzheit. So, it is meaningful to hold space today to honor the anniversary of the passing of so many of our fellow citizens. 2,977 souls lost their lives that day. As Steve Buscemi elevated, we are approaching the same number losing their lives to cancer caused by helping to sort through the debris from those horrific events.

Attack on United States soil

One thing that can get lost in the discussion of the twenty years since that attack, is the fundamental reason for its significance: we were not in a major war and the United States was attacked by an enemy. While Pearl Harbor has its own place in the history of the U.S. officially entering the Second World War, that was a military target. The 9/11 terrorists were targeting the centers of American capitalism, military, and government. At no other time in our history have we come so close to seeing devastation to the symbols of our institutional coherence.

Flight 93 aimed at the White House. But the 40 brave passengers on board fought back and ultimately took down the plane in Shanksville, Pennsylvania.

Twenty years is a long time. I remember watching the World Trade Center Twin Towers burn and collapse on the Today Show. But the details are fuzzy. The Washington Post republished their coverage of the surreal day.

Not about a victim count

On Twitter, folks are quick to point out 656,318 Americans died from COVID-19, yet we have not united to tackle the pandemic. So why should the anniversary of people dying in a terrorist attack evoke more collective mourning than the deaths we are currently living through?

This is not only about the 2,977 people who lost their lives to terrorist attacks twenty years ago. This anniversary is about reflecting on the moment when our collective identity fundamentally shifted.

Remember Amalek

Deuteronomy 25:17 demands that Jews remember (zachor) Amalek, the one who attacked us from behind. It is elevated beyond its place in Parshat Ki Teitzei and is read again on Shabbat Zachor, the Shabbat of Remembrance before Purim. Haman is described as a descendant of Amalek. The Hebrew Bible connects all of our enemies in the same clan of people.

This is why 9/11 is so important. It clarified for a generation who their enemy is: terrorists. Not simply people with different beliefs, who choose to make women second-class citizens and disparage representative democracy and free market capitalism. These people make it their mission to murder us and encourage individuals to instigate terrorist attacks on civilian targets throughout the world. These terrorists are Amalek.

Islamophobia and the War on Terror

In the past, I was quite reticent to fully acknowledge how life altering this attack was to the American spirit. It was hard to hold space for the depth of pain felt by the families of the victims. Instead, I turned my energy to fighting Islamophobia and challenging the War on Terror.

Ten years ago, I wrote a resolution for the U.S. Conference of Mayors, calling on Congress to end the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and to bring the money home for the needs of our cities. It was the culmination of my activist career. I wrote the resolution in such a way that it was debated by the Metro Economies committee, rather than the International Affairs committee. The resolution became the lens through which the media covered the annual mayors’ meeting.

I chose to step aside from activism because having that as my core identity meant that I never stopped fighting. My goal has always been to help the world become a place that is open to the breadth of human experience and to prioritize life-affirming activities. Now, I tackle those issues from a spiritual perspective.

Honor Difference, Turn Inward, Challenge Amalek

This Shabbat Shuvah, this Ten Days of Return and Renewal, I choose to honor our differences. My Judaism is quite different from other people’s Judaism. I choose not to disparage them. Our disagreements are for the sake of Heaven. My core beliefs are distinct from Christians, Muslims, Hindus, Buddhists, atheists, and countless other spiritual seekers. At the end of the day, my path is not about proclaiming that my way is the only way to be good and experience holiness. We each have a spark of the Divine within us. Our souls connect us across our differences.

My soul cries out for all that we’ve lost. I graduated college in 2000. I am one of the last people who did not experience terror during my childhood or formative years. My international relations courses at Wellesley College posited the end of history and the peaceful future of globalization.

I reflect on how difficult it is for me to physically be around other people. My fear of the Delta variant and my concern for the health of my unvaccinated children is more disorienting than collective memories of a terrorist attack.

Amalek: people motivated by evil intentions, still exist. My patriotism and love of the United States is built on my belief in representative democracy and our collective power to support human flourishing in our country and throughout the world. May we honor the souls around us and gird ourselves for the continuing fight.

Rosh HaShanah 5782: Allowing Grace to Transform Us

I am the rabbinic intern at Temple Beth David of the San Gabriel Valley and I had the honor of giving a sermon today, reflecting on my journey, God’s Grace, and using descriptions of the Divine as a blueprint for how we can live into the best versions of ourselves. L’Shanah Tovah U’Metukah. May we co-create a good and sweet year.

A PDF of the version of this sermon that I delivered at Temple Beth David is available if you click these words.

Boundaries within Foundation, 37 Days Omer 5781

Today is thirty-seven days, which is five weeks and two days of the Omer in the year 5781. גבורה שביסוד, Gevurah ShebeYesod, Boundaries within Foundation. This year, reflecting on the contours of the personality. Does it align with my highest vision for myself?

Our boundaries are misaligned with our highest potential. The mishappen gate in the picture can represent all the ways this pandemic has altered the course of lives, in ways both obvious and unknown.

Separate from ruminating on COVID-19, a personality can imprison us in bad habits, ideas, and identities. The cyncial, angry activist sees everything in the world as needing fundamental change. The consummate peacemaker can give into the whims of a tyrant until their own identity ceases to exist. Extremes in any direction lead down false paths. Flourishing occurs within the middle path, balancing all aspects of one’s personality.

This starts with a clear vision of the person you want to be. I knew the best version of myself emerged in Jewish communal prayer. I wanted to sink into that aspect of myself and moved myself, slowly, towards rabbinical school in order to better embody that aspect of me. Eleven years into this journey, I am constantly seeking further refinement. My interpersonal habits are deeply ingrained from childhood. This is why bullet journaling and the science of habits speak to me. Each year is an opportunity for me to become the best version of me I can be in this moment.

Define your vision

To understand the contours of my personality, I read about the Shadow, the Enneagram, and Neurosis. Carefully, day by day, I remind myself that who I was before does not define who I am in this moment or in the future. The grip of the story I told about myself began to loosen.

I remain a work in progress. Rather than trying to appear Perfect to my children, I admit my faults and let them know I am working to become a better parent. Just as my ability to preach is a never-completed process, so too is my ability to parent. Decide what relationships are most important to you. Clarify how you want to show up in each situation, especially the stressful ones. And hold yourself accountable to your vision.

Books for the journey

Previously today…

Boundaries during COVID-19, 5780 / 2020.

Boundaries in Bonding, 5779 / 2019.

Don’t lose yourself to the crowd, 5778 / 2018.

Discipline in interpersonal relationships, 5777 / 2017.


Image by Tim Hill via Pixabay.

Indwelling of Gratitude, 35 Days of Omer 5781

Today is thirty-five days, which is five weeks of the Omer in the year 5781. שכינה שבהוד, Shechinah ShebeHod, Indwelling of Gratitude.

Wouldn’t life be wonderful if we could dwell in the sacred knowing of our interconnectedness every moment? If the gratitude and splendor forever surrounding us infused every response? If instead of pandemic fatigue, we met each day with joyful excitement and wonder?

Magic wands wont save us. Belief in the power of gratitude alone cannot change us. Instead, we much do the painful work of walking towards change.

First, slow down long enough to observe what sets you off. Before I get angry, what is the spark? Before I started doomscrolling, was I bored? How can I offer myself a different response to each stimulus that leads to the same reward? This is the true work of spiritual transformation: recognizing that each day, we choose better and worse ways to respond to what is happening beyond us and within us.

May the Indwelling of Gratitude, marking the completion of five weeks of counting emanations of Divine overflow, help me transform my habits. May I emerge calmer and more deeply rooted within the speech and actions I wish to embody.

Previously today…

Grieving the profound loss of Dr. Bob Levy, may his righteous memory forever passionately envelop us, 5780 / 2020.

Splendor gives us life, 5779 / 2019.

Allowing Splendor to Flourish, 5778 / 2018.

Bonding with the Infinite, 5777 / 2017.

Still reading…


Image by Pixabay via Pexels.